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Showing posts from April, 2012

How to get shortcodes (plugs) for zeebizzcard theme working

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I recently ran into problem with zeebizzcard theme for WordPress, where I was unable to enter the shortcode for "plugs", which displays Personal Details in very nice way. I posted the issue to themezee (creator of zeebizzcard theme) on facebook and even on wordpress support. I got no answer from them or from any other. The theme is so good that I did not wanted to move to other theme. But if your home page is not as you wish, you might get the feeling to move to some other theme completely. With no support from anywhere, I decided to dig the code of the theme (though I am no programmer). Within couple of days, I got the solution.
Note: The solution on this page for shortcodes on ZeeBizzCard will work only with writing very little amount of code (text), for which explanation is given below, and is not implied to make the buttons work.

To get the Personal Details  on a page when the shortcode on the WordPress editor (buttons) is not working, first make sure you have filled …

What is /dev/cciss/c0d0p1

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Recently I ran into issue to find out what is /dev/cciss/c0d0pX. Unfortunately, there was no direct and simple answer from the great Google.
This thing you can find in Linux OS where your partitions are mounted on  for eg. /dev/cciss/c0d0p2 instead on regular /dev/hdaX or /dev/sdaX. These are kind of "virtual disks" (/dev/cciss/c0d0) and are NOT regular hard disks (unlike /dev/hda or /dev/sda). Actually, these are RAID device configured from the BIOS or SmartStart CD before installing the OS. 
When you will try to install the Linux OS over such RAID configured from BIOS level, your OS will detect them as "/dev/cciss/c0d0" disks instead of regular "/dev/hda" or "/dev/sda". Although you can use them as your normal drives and create partitions, which will be called as “/dev/cciss/c0d0p1”, “/dev/cciss/c0d0p2”, etc, whereas your normal drives would have looked like “/dev/hda1”, “/dev/hda2”, etc or “/dev/sda1”, “/dev/sda2”, etc. You CAN use these par…